1970s Music Man 210 'sixty-five'
1970s Music Man 210 ‘sixty-five’

Model Description:

This mid-‘70s U.S. made Music Man 210 ‘sixty-five’ is a real gem of a vintage valve amplifier. In my view, it’s a genuine ‘sleeper’ find. After Leo Fender left the company he created, he signed a 10-year agreement not to compete. Once his obligation to Fender expired, he turned his sights to designing amps, guitars and basses under the Music Man brand. However, this isn’t just any Music Man amp; it is one of the much sought after early ‘first series’ models, including the black on silver badging (later ones reversed the colouring). Although it is technically a hybrid amp, it has a pre-amp valve (a 12AX7 for the splitter/phase inverter, tech‑heads). The power amp is all-valve (2xEL34) and hand‑wired point‑to‑point!  Very cool. In summary, it has 2 channels, one with tremolo and spring reverb, as well as additional switches for added flexibility, producing up to 65 watts RMS into 2 original 10” alnico-magnet Music Man speakers. The cabinet is joined solid joined pine. It is only the early models (1974-1979) that have all these features.  Leo Fender felt that his Music Man amps were improvements on the models being made by Fender at the time. When Ernie Ball acquired Music Man in 1984, manufacture of the amps and guitars had been discontinued, which is a huge shame. 

 

Amplifier Description:

I’ve been looking for one of these (or a 112 ‘sixty-five’) for ages and it is sensational. This particular one is in excellent, all-original condition. Thankfully, it has survived intact over the decades – the superb original speakers (often changed) and the original dual footswitch (often lost or stolen) are present and working. The specification is one thing; it also sounds fantastic, just like a vintage valve amp carrying genuine Fender DNA should sound (and feel). From clean to overdriven, the sparkling tones are all present and correct. Some criticise MM amps compared to older Fenders but I just don’t agree. The reverb is sensuous and the tremolo is one of the best ever made. The ‘Bright’, ‘Deep’ and ‘Hi/Lo’ switches mean that it adapts easily to many difference situations. It can be very loud for its size and it is built like a rock for work‑horse reliability. Despite its diminutive dimensions, it’s also very heavy, hence the casters! As vintage Music Man amps don’t carry the big- ‘F’ logo (and associated price tag), they are also remarkably good value for what you get. If you can find a good, original working one like this baby at a reasonable price, you have a real bargain. Dating it is tricky as MM serial numbers were sequential, rather than using a ‘system’. I haven’t dismantled it to date the pots. Search one out, I don’t think you will be disappointed.

Features:

  • Made in Anaheim, California, USA
  • Solid pine open-back cabinet covered in black tolex with top-mounted carrying handle and chrome hardware
  • Silver speaker cloth with black-on-silver brand and model badges
  • Original 2×10” Music Man alnico-magnet speakers
  • Up to 65 watts RMS into 4 ohms
  • Solid state pre-amp with 12AX7 valve
  • Hand-wired power amp with 2xEL34 valves
  • 2 channels, each with 2 x ¼” input jack sockets
  • Channel 1: volume, treble, and bass
  • Channel 2: volume, treble, middle, bass, reverb and tremolo (intensity/speed), bright  switch
  • Master volume and deep switch
  • Overall Standby and Hi/Off/Lo switch (which reduces voltage to valve plates) with red jewel light
  • Original dual footswitch for reverb and tremolo
  • Speaker extension jack socket with 4/8 Ohm switch
  • Dimensions: 16½” (h) x 24¼” (w) x 9½” (d)
  • Weight: 52lbs

Detail Gallery:


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